The Foreign Policy Legacy of the Great War

July 1, 2016 marked the centenary of the Battle of the Somme, one of the costliest engagements of the First World War. Dominated by tragically outdated battle tactics, the Somme offensive stands as a sort of bloody microcosm for the entirety of the Great War: catastrophic loss of life at the hands of industrial war for little tactical gain or apparent meaning. Now, the modern international climate increasingly seems to have echoes of the diplomatic tone that led to such a horrific conflict. Recent electoral trends seem to indicate a…

The Ethics of Nudge Theory in Policy Implementation

In an era of unprecedented polarization and daily legislative gridlock, policy makers are always looking for new and innovative ways to create solutions to the problems of today. Traditional avenues of regulatory mandates are often time consuming, cost-prohibitive and have the potential to fail in achieving the very goals they set out to meet. Enter nudge theory, an alternative approach to policy implementation that eschews the normal route of collective discussion and application of mandates. Rather than centering on the creation of a more deliberative democracy, nudge theory operates on…

Why the Current Approach to Environmental Policy Needs to Change

Mention the name Richard Nixon to the average American citizen and the first images that pop into their mind will undoubtedly be those of Watergate. The scandal changed how the country viewed the Presidency and forever redefined a man, eclipsing his other achievements almost entirely. One of these achievements was the formation of the Environmental Protection Agency, which consolidated existing efforts to combat human activity’s effect on the Earth’s climate. Since 1970 the Agency has grown in size and scope, using its current annual budget of $7.9 billion to “protect…

The Scott Walker Factor

The end of February marked the passage of the annual Conservative Political Action Conference and with it one of the earliest Republican cattle calls leading up to the 2016 presidential election. The convention allots potential candidates the opportunity to test their mettle with the base of the GOP and see if they have what it takes to mobilize grassroots activists. The straw poll released at the end of the event rarely acts as an accurate litmus test for who will win the nomination, but it does act as a benchmark…

The Merits and Pitfalls of Mitt Romney

During the recent midterm elections, 2012 GOP presidential nominee Mitt Romney was a sought out commodity on the campaign trail for Republican candidates. After a string of successful primary endorsements, Romney emerged as both a fundraising powerhouse and a valuable asset for candidates throughout the country, including appearances with successful senate contestants Joni Ernst of Iowa and Dan Sullivan of Alaska. Romney also stayed in the public eye through a number of television appearances, which saw the former Massachusetts Governor attack the Obama administration’s foreign policy and provide his take…

The Next Step for Republicans

After months of campaigning and millions of dollars spent, Election Day 2014 has finally come and gone, leaving the American public with a GOP controlled Senate and the largest Republican majority in the House since the 1940s. The Republican Governors Association will also be adding some new faces to the mix after a surprising string of gubernatorial victories across the country, including solidly blue states like Illinois, Maryland and Massachusetts. While some races remain too close to call, the bigger question on the public’s mind is what the Republican surge…

Why Re-Intervention in Iraq is a Strategic Necessity 

Serving as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1957 until his resignation in 1963, Harold Macmillan was a Conservative pragmatist who arguably faded from popular memory, eclipsed by the towering shadows of figures such as Margaret Thatcher or Winston Churchill. To the astute, however, he is remembered beyond his record as PM for delivering what is arguably one of the most memorable responses delivered by a politician. Upon being asked by a journalist what he thought would be most likely to derail his government, Macmillan replied in his characteristic…

Republican Reformation: How the GOP Can Turn it Around

In politics, connection with voters is everything. A candidate’s ability to relate to his or her voters is something that keeps campaign managers and the political consultant class up at night, and is a finicky force that can make or break a nominee regardless of how he or she might look on paper. If voters feel comfortable enough to place trust in the candidate, checking a box next to a name on a ballot becomes as easy and natural as texting a friend to catch a movie. Outside of the…