The Opioid and Heroin Crisis: A Year Later and Many Remain Forgotten

A year ago, voters were promised revolutionary changes and a shake-up of the status quo. At the receiving end of this promise was a class of Americans who felt they had been left behind; it seemed the economy didn’t have room for them and the government no longer cared. This hopelessness was particularly acute in addiction-ravaged industrial and manufacturing towns across the country. Drug deaths around the country were rising at extraordinary levels. In 2016 alone, 64,000 Americans died from drug overdoses and over two million more were dependent on…

The Party of Trump

On July 19, 2016 presumptive Republican nominee Donald J. Trump seized control of the Grand Old Party. His fringe populism was expected to dictate the party’s ebb and flow for the remainder of the general election, but the party’s long-term destiny would still be in the hands of the Republican establishment. Although wary of a Trumpian overthrow, the logic within the establishment class went something like this: give Trump his desired treasure, reign in his frivolities, and puppeteer him as a vehicle for driving a conservative agenda. Trump won his…

Conservative Provocation and the Assault on Free Speech

Free speech is a cornerstone of our democracy, and a college education must herald free speech by exposing students to new ideas that challenge their own convictions. A few weeks ago, a “Free Speech Week” was cancelled at Berkley University amidst logistical confusion. The event, organized by a young Conservative student group, was headlined by conservative provocateurs Milo Yiannopoulos, Ann Coulter, and Steve Bannon. Despite the event falling apart, protests ensued, highlighting the polarization of political views on campus and a burgeoning movement against provocation disguised as free speech.    …

Theresa May and the Promise of National Stability

On April 19, the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, Theresa May, sparked an unexpected political firestorm; she asked members of Parliament to trigger a snap-general election for June 8, 2017. This news came as a shock to members of Parliament, politicos, media, and the public alike. When asked before whether she planned on announcing a general election to diffuse political gridlock over Brexit negotiations, Prime Minister May told the public, on multiple occasions, she would not consider the option. However, amidst political “game playing,” which she warned would destroy…

Democrats Should Support the Nomination of Judge Neil Gorsuch

Filling the seat of Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia has proved challenging since his sudden passing last February. Former President Barack Obama judiciously nominated Merrick Garland, an eminently qualified and worthy candidate, to fill the vacancy on the highest court of the nation. Despite Garland’s extraordinary credentials, the Republican party used their majority in the Senate to block his nomination. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell stood firmly by his party’s decision to “give the people a voice in filling this vacancy.” McConnell and the Republican party desired to make the…

Trumpcare: An Unconscionable Attack on Aging Americans

After seven years of battling Barack Obama’s signature healthcare legislation, the Republican Party has finally fulfilled their promise to offer a replacement plan, the American Healthcare Act (ACHA). While seemingly trying to strike middle ground, the architects of the bill have created friction on both sides of the aisle: Democrats are concerned that the legislation will rip health coverage away from millions of Americans; conservative Republicans complain that AHCA is just another overzealous entitlement program; and President Trump struck an uncharacteristically ambivalent tone when he tweeted the bill was ready…

Historical Revisionism and Racial Assuagement: In Defense of Yale’s Response to Inveterate Racism

In a recent article, FPR columnist Paul Ingrassia shrewdly addressed Yale University’s decision to rename a residential college bearing the namesake of former Vice President John C. Calhoun. Ingrassia made a clear and concise argument positing that historical revisionism is dangerous. I sincerely agree with Paul: history’s importance is second to none and politicizing it is damaging to future generations. As the late, Democratic Party intellect Arthur Schlesinger argued in The Disuniting of America, history should not be subject to “current political fads.” Yet, Yale’s recent decision is not the…

A Deeper Look into Brexit’s “Calamity”

One month ago, I boarded a plane headed towards London for a semester abroad. By stepping into the cabin of my Delta airliner, I was leaving one country where the incoming administration was producing a political climate clouded by uncertainty and entering another where the prospect of future European cooperation appeared dismal. At this point in time, the United Kingdom’s “Brexit” moment was the equivalent of the United States’s Donald Trump moment. Both represented the wavering fragility of our current geopolitical state. Yet, today, I find my preconceived notions wrong…