Vive la révolution: Europe’s fate in Le Pen’s hands

In one month from now, France will elect its new head of state while the rest of the world becomes nervous bystanders to what is arguably a globalists’ greatest challenge to date. France’s constitution stipulates that a presidential election is to be held every five years, allowing for the possibility of a runoff if no candidate secures a popular majority in the first round. Presently, the election appears to be a two-horse race between Marine Le Pen, leader of the National Front, a Eurosceptic, anti-immigration party, and Emmanuel Macron, who’s…

Why We Should All Eat Insects

I had just listened to a speech by Secretary of State John Kerry at the United Nations Social Good Summit in New York City, when I decided to take a break and walk outside for a while. The summit was held at the 92nd Street Y, a nonprofit Jewish community center, and during the event, a street festival was taking place outside to celebrate the neighborhood’s diversity with performances from various countries. After bumping into a few friends that were campaigned for a local state senate candidate, an ice cream…

The Foreign Policy Legacy of the Great War

July 1, 2016 marked the centenary of the Battle of the Somme, one of the costliest engagements of the First World War. Dominated by tragically outdated battle tactics, the Somme offensive stands as a sort of bloody microcosm for the entirety of the Great War: catastrophic loss of life at the hands of industrial war for little tactical gain or apparent meaning. Now, the modern international climate increasingly seems to have echoes of the diplomatic tone that led to such a horrific conflict. Recent electoral trends seem to indicate a…

Obama’s Foreign Policy Legacy

Obama is perhaps the biggest game changer of our lifetime. Besides being the first African-American president, he enacted numerous major policy shifts and programs such as the Affordable Care Act and a financial stimulus package after the Great Recession, and he made progress in the battle against climate change. Domestic policy is where President Obama has made his biggest waves in the news and his greatest enemies. He struggled to put many of his ideas into action due to two deadlocked Congresses and many strong enemies on the right. His…

The Sustainable Development Goals: The United Nations’ Final Frontier

The United Nations launched the Sustainable Development Goals in September 2015. These 17 goals, which consist of 169 targets, are the UN’s attempt to address the developmental shortcomings of the world by the year 2030. In contrast to the Millennium Goals of 2000 (completed in 2015), which aimed to eradicate poverty, the SDGs focus on developing economic prosperity, establishing environmental protection, and ensuring social justice – primarily in the developing countries of the world. Now a year out from their launch, the SDGs have been scrutinized for their effectiveness and…

Pope Francis’ Utopia: A Moral Free Market Society, or a Catholic Socialist State?

Pope Francis has used the “Chair of Saint Peter” in ways that seem, to many people, “political.” Whether through his actions to promote relations between the U.S. and Cuba, or through democratic socialist Bernie Sanders’ visit to Vatican City, Pope Francis has displayed a message that, from afar, can be seen as encouragement for socialist reform. The question is whether or not this reform is one that uproots the basic bedrock of capitalism, directing nations toward socialism, or if it is strictly a moral outcry, a plea to the starved…

Germany as a Permanent U.N. Security Council Member

In May 1945, after five and a half years of global war, the Allied nations occupied a devastated Germany. Although Japan’s surrender was four months away, and America still drafted plans for a seaborne invasion of the home islands, the war’s main antagonist was destroyed. The most infamous military in human history was disbanded, the concentration camps were emptied, and after Karl Dönitz’s Flensburg government was dismissed on May 23, the fascist administration was finally swept away.  For the first time since 1939, Germany was at peace. What followed was…

Rethinking Multiculturalism: How Can Europe Integrate Millions of Refugees?

I was there when it happened. It was New Year’s Eve, and my best friend and I had just left a nightclub in the inner city of Hamburg when we were suddenly in the middle of a throng of people. It was impossible to move; the entire street was crowded with hundreds of people crushed together. When people started pushing each other, the entire situation spiraled out of control. A few meters away an adjacent girl started screaming, telling a group of men to stop touching her; they persisted. She…