The Polls Aren’t Working Against Donald Trump

As this election cycle enters its waning moments, there’s been a lot of talk from Donald Trump about a “silent majority” of voters who secretly support him but are too afraid to say it in public or over the phone to pollsters. The term comes from one of Nixon’s 1969 speeches, and it’s been used unsparingly ever since by candidates seeking to shed light on a section of the electorate that they feel isn’t being fully illustrated by polling data. Recently, Trump has latched onto the idea, arguing that many…

Trump’s Path to 270

Over the past week, the presidential race has tightened prodigiously between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump to a virtual standstill. Particularly newsworthy events over the last seven days that have contributed to the narrowing of the polls include a favorable jobs report, news about an expected hike in Obamacare premiums for the upcoming year, and perhaps most impactful, the FBI’s announcement to reopen the Clinton email investigation after finding new evidence in an unrelated probe on Anthony Weiner (on Sunday, the FBI disclosed that it would ultimately not bring charges…

Hillary’s October Surprise

For an historically calamitous presidential election cycle, Hillary Clinton’s campaign was handed a deafening blow just a week out from Election Day. In an October that broke historically low ground for scandal and controversy, mudslinging, and inflammatory remarks, it is altogether fitting that the month culminated with what has been the crème de la crème of controversies this election cycle: Clinton’s emails. FBI Director James Comey’s ostensibly impromptu decision to reopen the probe on Clinton’s emails after discovery of new revelations linked to the server of vilified former congressman Anthony…

How Disruptive Tech Can Change Our Cultural Landscape

Amazing new inventions are hitting the markets every year, and the nation’s political, economic, and technological landscapes are vastly different today than they were even a decade ago. It’s the age of disruptive technology, which can loosely be summed up as an invention (or a set of them) that radically alters the face of a market, changing the way that the actors in it do business. Tech giants are picking up on the craze – in 2014, Facebook purchased Oculus Rift (a virtual reality software start-up) in a widely-publicized deal…

Republicans Finally Abandon Ship, Revealing Depths of Party Loyalty

Throughout the past two weeks, over 30 prominent Republican Party members have withdrawn support from their presidential nominee, Donald Trump. The most frequently cited reason for this wave of condemnation is the unearthed 2005 video where Trump makes light of groping women without their consent. Many Republicans, even those who were formerly supportive of him, have used this opportunity to denounce Trump for his blatant disrespect for women, arguing that he is unsuitable to hold the highest office of the land. With such high stakes, these concerns are only natural.…

How Mosul Can Reshape Obama’s Foreign Policy Legacy

In mid-June of 2014, smoke rolled into the sky above Mosul, the second-largest city in Iraq. Burning Humvees littered streets that had once bustled with people. Only days earlier, the Islamic State had invaded the city, crushing the ill-equipped Iraqi security detail that had been assigned to protect it. The stunning defeat gave the radical group its first strong foothold in Iraq (most of its activity had been in Syria up to that point) and allowed it to use the city as its base of operations in the country. The…

This is what oligarchy looks like

“This is what oligarchy looks like: Today, the top one-tenth of 1 percent owns almost as much wealth as the bottom 90 percent. The top one-hundredth of 1 percent makes more than 40 percent of all campaign contributions. The billionaire class owns the political system and reaps the benefits from it.”                                                                         – Sen. Bernie…

Why True Conservatives Should Never Be “Never Trump”

The late, great William F. Buckley, founder of the National Review, once advised his fellow conservatives that when deciding on the next president, they should choose the “most right, viable candidate who could win.” Those words – originally spoken in 1967 – are especially fitting for 2016, given how much is at stake this election cycle, and moreover, the relative unorthodox nature of the populist-conservatism Donald Trump has brought to the ticket. Though I understand many conservatives have been turned off by his rhetoric, Trump has sworn to rollback the…