The Polarization of Political Dialogue in the Arab World

The Arab world has been plagued with a series of corrupt governments for much of recent history. Beginning in late 2010, growing discontent led to a series of popular uprisings known as the Arab Spring. In the streets, the schools, the cafés, the places of worship, there was no refuge from political debate. From Marrakech to Manama, the winds of revolution swept through the region as the people’s frustrations proved to be uncontainable. The mesmerizing changes of the political landscape held the world’s attention, but it is the changes at the…

The Arab Spring Four Years On: Reflections on a Movement Gone Wrong

When the Arab Spring erupted, quite literally, with a spark caused by Mohamed Bouazizi’s self-immolation in Tunisia, the international community watched with bated breath.  The region that we had long written off as consistently oppressive, backwards, and anti-democratic, was beginning to wake up, finally, and smell the sweet fragrance of freedom and democracy.  The masses across the Arab world were shaking off their oppressors and demanding the political and social freedom that they had been denied for too long. As of this writing, the protests led to rulers being forced…

Transition in Tunisia: A Post-Arab Spring Democracy

Tunisia, the birthplace of the Arab Spring, has proven this month that it is one of the most successful post-revolution states in an otherwise divided region. Two weeks ago, Tunisia held its second national election since its 2011 Arab Spring uprising. The election was the first under the newly instated constitution and was the first full parliamentary election after the resignation of Tunisian President Zine El-Abidine Ben Ali in January of 2011. Tunisia, the birthplace of the Arab Spring protests, has had one of the least violent transitions of the…