How Mosul Can Reshape Obama’s Foreign Policy Legacy

In mid-June of 2014, smoke rolled into the sky above Mosul, the second-largest city in Iraq. Burning Humvees littered streets that had once bustled with people. Only days earlier, the Islamic State had invaded the city, crushing the ill-equipped Iraqi security detail that had been assigned to protect it. The stunning defeat gave the radical group its first strong foothold in Iraq (most of its activity had been in Syria up to that point) and allowed it to use the city as its base of operations in the country. The…

Japan’s Response to ISIS

Perhaps it was the sheer brutality of Muath al-Kasesbeh’s death by immolation that caused attention to shift so quickly. Prior to ISIS’s horrific execution of the Jordanian fighter pilot who crash landed in enemy territory in Syria, international outrage at the terror group was aimed towards its recent beheadings of a pair of Japanese nationals. While the world voiced its indignation at the deaths of Haruna Yukawa and Kenji Goto, ISIS proceeded to set a new benchmark for savagery—even by its own standards—by burning al-Kasesbeh alive in a gut-wrenching video posted…

Why Re-Intervention in Iraq is a Strategic Necessity 

Serving as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1957 until his resignation in 1963, Harold Macmillan was a Conservative pragmatist who arguably faded from popular memory, eclipsed by the towering shadows of figures such as Margaret Thatcher or Winston Churchill. To the astute, however, he is remembered beyond his record as PM for delivering what is arguably one of the most memorable responses delivered by a politician. Upon being asked by a journalist what he thought would be most likely to derail his government, Macmillan replied in his characteristic…