The Francis Effect and the Fight Over Catholic Identity

  It’s a familiar scene: a “radical” speaker is invited to a college campus, until the skittish university decides to rescind the offer to avoid controversy. The twist? The radical figure here is a Jesuit priest, Father James Martin, and the university was Catholic University. Father Martin was scheduled to speak at Catholic University’s seminary Theological College, on September 15, when the seminary decided to cancel his appearance.  In an official statement the following day, Catholic University expressed disappointment that Father Martin had been uninvited. Nonetheless, the offer was rescinded,…

Unam Sanctam Catholicam: A Call for a Renewal of Tradition in the Catholic Church

It has been over a half-century since the closure of the Second Vatican Council, which ran in multiple sessions from 1963 to 1965 under the papacies of Pope Saint John XXIII and Pope Paul VI. Vatican II, as the ecumenical council is colloquially known is considered the defining moment of the Church in the twentieth century.  The Council brought forth historic change to the Roman Catholic Church, thereby fundamentally altering the liturgy and dispensing with centuries of tradition to appease a world society that had freshly emerged from the two…

Pope Francis’ Utopia: A Moral Free Market Society, or a Catholic Socialist State?

Pope Francis has used the “Chair of Saint Peter” in ways that seem, to many people, “political.” Whether through his actions to promote relations between the U.S. and Cuba, or through democratic socialist Bernie Sanders’ visit to Vatican City, Pope Francis has displayed a message that, from afar, can be seen as encouragement for socialist reform. The question is whether or not this reform is one that uproots the basic bedrock of capitalism, directing nations toward socialism, or if it is strictly a moral outcry, a plea to the starved…

On Modernity, Apoliticism, and Inequality: How We Should Promote Companionship Rather than Competition

Moments of popular upheaval, resistance, and revolution have a common underlying cause: they arise from popular dissatisfaction with economic and political systems. Protesters, proletarians, common people are dissatisfied with a political process that does not hear their voices, does not guarantee them their needs and rights, and sees them only by their industrial capacity, as instruments. Meanwhile the debate between politicians and the political class on various issues continues without real representation for those whom the policies would be imposed on, whose lives would be destroyed without adequate protection. Modernity…