The Electoral College after 2016

A divided nation produced an astonishingly divided result in the presidential election on Nov. 8. While Donald Trump, the billionaire business magnate, captured enough Electoral College votes to secure the presidency, former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton earned more popular votes. Currently, she stands over two million votes ahead of the president-elect. This occurrence illustrates a divide between urban and rural America, which received little focus leading up to the general election. The Electoral College, as defined by the National Archives, was established by the founding fathers “as a compromise…

The Next Step for Republicans

After months of campaigning and millions of dollars spent, Election Day 2014 has finally come and gone, leaving the American public with a GOP controlled Senate and the largest Republican majority in the House since the 1940s. The Republican Governors Association will also be adding some new faces to the mix after a surprising string of gubernatorial victories across the country, including solidly blue states like Illinois, Maryland and Massachusetts. While some races remain too close to call, the bigger question on the public’s mind is what the Republican surge…

FPR Interviews – Kim Strassel

Kim Strassel is a member of the Wall Street Journal’s editorial board, and the author of the newspaper’s weekly “Potomac Watch” column. She was a guest of the Fordham University College Republicans on Monday, October 6th to speak in Keating 3rd Auditorium on the consequences of the 2014 midterm elections. College Republicans President Benjamin Shull, who is also Editor-in-Chief of the Fordham Political Review, sat down with her after her lecture. In your recent column in the Wall Street Journal “Why Nancy Pelosi Is Smiling” (op-ed, Sept. 25), you note…

Political Pragmatism in California’s 52nd Congressional District

It’s October 2014 and it is all about the Senate. Although our biennial midterm elections include the House the Representatives as well, coverage of the lower chamber has been minimal this cycle. All eyes are on the U.S. Senate and whether Harry Reid’s Democratic Party will cling to its slim majority or if the GOP will win the net six seats needed to flip control of the upper chamber. Polls certainly point to the latter case being more likely, but with a month to go until Election Day, both possibilities remain…

Race for the Senate 2014: A Cheat Sheet

With the current situation in the Senate, the Republican Party would need a net gain of six seats in order to take back control from the Democrats. Of the ten closest elections listed below, Democrats hold eight of the seats and the Republicans hold two. Already, three races (West Virginia, Montana, and South Dakota) are solid Republican pick-ups from the Democrats. Senator Jay Rockefeller (D-WV) and Senator Tim Johnson (D-SD) have decided to retire from politics in these two red states. Former Senator Max Baucus (D-MT) was selected earlier in…

The Tea Party: Enemies of Conservatism

It takes places in a grassy field. Sitting in the back of a white pick-up truck is Dwayne Stovall, a businessman clad in denim from head to toe with a rifle leaning against his side. Resting comfortably next to him is his dog, panting as his owner rips into Texas Republican Senator John Cornyn. Mr. Stovall, who recently challenged Cornyn in Texas’s Republican primary, rips into the senator’s alliance with Senate minority leader Mitch McConnell, who Stovall pans for looking and fighting like a turtle. After repeating this absurd motif in…

The Right’s Governing Problem

It comes as no surprise that the Republican Party has been labeled the party of ‘no’ over the past four years.  A party once ruled by established, pragmatic, old school politicians was rocked when Barack Obama cruised into the oval office on what the far right saw as a wave of ultra-liberal ideologies, threatening to destroy the basic foundations of the United States.  This fear energized an extreme right wing of the Republican Party into forming a coalition called the Tea Party. As of this current Congressional session, there are…